lørdag 31. desember 2016

Where on Google Earth #588


This will be polished a bit,  but I really want it up for New year!

Fireworks may have been involved...



As always, the first person to post the position and whatever is interesting about the geology/hydrology/geowhatever in this location, wins the privilege of hosting the next WoGE.

Previous WoGEs are collected by Felix on 
his blog and a KML file.

6 kommentarer:

  1. Hello!

    I recently discovered Woge on the swung.rocks slack group, what a great game. I've been doing somewhat similar challenges with friends by sending photos taken from random places we go to.

    I believe the site in question is geo:-19.592222,17.933611 in Namibia. The Hoba meteorite is located here.

    The meteorite was initially excavated and reported on in 1920. In 1932 in a an article titled "Hoba (South-West Africa), the largest known meteorite" the meteorite's mass was estimated to be up to 87 tons, consisting mainly of iron (81%) and nickel (17%). The meteorite is regarded as the largest know single piece meteorite on earth's surface.

    The meteorite hasn't been moved from where it impacted roughly 80 000 years ago, and now serves as an attraction for tourists visiting the area.


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    1. Jarmo: I see first signs of an phyton algorithm for finding locations. So maybe in future we don't have to scan for many hours in Google Earth but can watch the latest movies and drink something instead. :-)

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    2. hehe, yep. This one was pure luck though. I'd been looking for it for some time earlier, then the next day I came back to browse more satellite imagery, and it took me maybe 30 seconds to stumble upon this. It was literally the first thing i zoomed in on.

      I definitely have a process that I've been using earlier for what I call 'mystery location' challenges. Here's an example of a recent solution (just the highlights)

      http://guttula.com/dump/snowplow-mystery-location.svg

      The picture with a red border is the original challenge. They usually come with no other context than the person who took the picture, and possibly a "I was here yesterday" -type message, which helps to narrow it down to maybe a country or city. For this one I made bad assumptions and stared looking about 1500 km away from the correct city, though.


      Usually I use http://overpass-turbo.eu/ to query for spatial data. With some python it's relatively easy to answer queries such as "where are there pedestrian paths within 100 meters of a
      hehe, yep. This one was pure luck though. I'd been looking for it for some time earlier, then the next day I came back to browse more satellite imagery, and it took me maybe 30 seconds to stumble upon this. It was literally the first thing i zoomed in on.

      I definitely have a process that I've been using earlier for what I call 'mystery location' challenges. Here's an example of a recent solution (just the highlights)

      http://guttula.com/dump/snowplow-mystery-location.svg

      The picture with a red border is the original challenge. They usually come with no other context than the person who took the picture, and possibly a "I was here yesterday" -type message, which helps to narrow it down to maybe a country or city. For this one I made bad assumptions and stared looking about 1500 km away from the correct city.


      Usually I use http://overpass-turbo.eu/ to query for spatial data. With some python it's relatively easy to answer queries like "where are there pedestrian paths within 100 meters of a roundabout within 100 km of Tromsø". I'm not sure how well the my process lends itself to searching half a hemisphere though, since the amount of data is much larger. I guess we'll see. roundabout within 100 km of Tromsø", as I did for this example. I'm not sure how well the my process lends itself to searching half a hemisphere though, since the amount of data is much larger. I guess we'll see.

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    3. Aah! Sorry for double pasting... ctrl+v+v

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  2. Absolutely correct Jarmo, and welcome to WoGE!

    This was a tricky one due to the lack of visual clues both to the area and to what the subject is. Congratulations on solving my new year fireworks puzzle!

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  3. The next woge is up: https://jarmokivekas.github.io/projects/woge-589/2017-01-08-woge-589.html

    I don't know if there is a way to make the water look nicer, since it's kind of ugly now, but...

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